Spring | Summer 2014 issue

On the cover: The brain learns to anticipate sequences and can recreate meaning from limited, or noisy, information. Although each individual word of the text is garbled, the sentence can be easily read because the brain has learned to anticipate the correct sequence of letters based on prior experience. MIT researchers have now shown that this learning can occur in primary visual cortex, V1, where it can be studied in mice. This surprising result suggests that the mechanistic bases of high-order cognitive spatiotemporal sequence learning can be studied in experimentally accessible sensory regions of the cortex.

Brain technology at BCS

  • Feature Story

Brain technology at BCS

Activating neurons with light may sound like something out of a science fiction novel, but it’s business as usual in the Tye laboratory.  Graduate student Christine Eckhardt knows this firsthand.